Austrian Minor Schillings
The schilling was the basic unit of currency of Austria until January 1, 2002 when the Euro replaced
Austria's national coins and notes.  The schilling could be subdivided into 100 groschen.  The name
schilling probably comes from the Old High German "scilling" probably after "scilt" or "schild"
meaning shield.  

The shilling was struck for the first time as money in France in 1266.  In the beginning in South,
Southwest and North Germany, Austria and Switzerland it was a twelve-pfennig piece.  From the
fourteenth century onwards, shillings were worth 6, 8 and 10 pfennigs. Then the "long schilling" of
Bavaria (worth 30 pfennigs) came along.  The last German schillings were issued for Mecklenburg in
1866.  

The Austrian schilling replaced the corona (Korona in German) in 1924.  Actually the last dated
corona type coins carried the 1916 date and the first schilling coin were issued eight years later in
1924.  The schilling was replaced by the German reichsmark during 1938-1945 but was
reintroduced in late 1945.

Starting in December 1945 the schilling was once again Austria`s sole legal tender unit of account.  
Coins were not released however until 1947 even though the one and two schilling coins bore a
1946 date.
Austrian Coins,
Medals & Tokens
      1946, 1947, 1952, 1957 One Schilling                                                           1959-2001 One Schilling
                                                                                                                        (1999-2001 only available in Mint Sets)


























         1946, 1947, 1952 Two Schilling.                                                               1952, 1957 Five Schilling.
























   1960-2001 Five Schilling.  
 (1999-2001 only available in Mint Sets)








The five Schilling coins minted from 1968 through 1999 were changed to a composition of Copper-Nickel
(750/250), 23.5 mm in diameter, weighs 4.80g and a smooth edge.  Both versions exist for 1968.  The latter version
has the same design as the earlier coin and was first issued January 15, 1969.





    1957-1973 Ten Schilling.                                                                                 1974-2001 Ten Schilling.
                                                                                                                               (1999-2001 only available in Mint Sets)
The obverse displays a farmer with seed pouch
sowing his field (a symbol for post-war reconstruction)
with a "1" and "S" to the left and right respectively
and "Republik Österreich" around the top.  The
reverse depicts the eagle of the Austrian Republic,
has no lettering, and a split date is located below the
eagle.  

This version of the one schilling coin has a
composition of Aluminum, diameter 25.0 mm, weight
2.00g, and has a smooth edge. The designer was
Michael Powolny.  The coin was  first issued
December 11, 1947.
This version of the one schilling depicts a large
numeral "1" on its obverse with "schilling" and date
below.  Across the top is "Republik Österreich".  

The reverse has a display of edelweiss, an alpine
flower.  The composition is Copper/Aluminum
(915/850), weights 4.28g, diameter 22.5 mm, and has
a smooth edge.  

The obverse was designed after a draft by Edwin
Grienauer.  The reverse was designed by Ferdinand
Welz and it was first issued September 1, 1959.
The obverse shows "Republik Österreich" around the edge
and the eagle of the Austrian Republic in the center.  

The reverse depicts the numeral "2" and "Schilling" in the
center surrounded by a mixed wreath. A divided date is
located at the bottom and it is made of Aluminum, 28 mm in
diameter, weighs 2.30g, and has a smooth edge.  

The 1952 Two Schilling is one of the very few modern
Austrian coins that can be expensive to acquire.  The coin
was  first issued December 11, 1947.
The obverse displays a large numeral "5" with "Schilling"
below and  "Republik Österreich" around the upper
edge.  

The reverse has the eagle of the Austrian Republic with
a divided date and no lettering.  It is composed of
Aluminum, has a diameter of 31 mm, weighs 4.0g, and
has a ribbed edge.  

The 1957 five schilling is another one of the very few
modern Austrian coins that are a little expensive to
acquire.  The coin was  first issued October 25, 1952.
The obverse depicts a Lipizzaner horse with its rider from the Spanish Court
RidingSchool.  The horse is performing what is called in Spanish, a levada.  
The reverse has the face value displayed above the red-white-red shield of
Austria. This version of the five schilling coin is 0.640 Silver, has a diameter of
23.5 mm, weighs 5.20g, and has a ribbed edge.  The obverse was designed by
Josef Köblinger and the reverse by Hans Köttenstorfer.  It  was  first issued
January 2, 1961.
The obverse displays the the red-white-red shield of Austria
surrounded by "Republik Österreich".  

The reverse shows the head of a lady, from the Wachau
region along the Danube, wearing the famous golden bonnet
of that district, the date is to the upper right, "10" to the lower
right and "shilling" around the left edge.   The composition is
.640 Silver, 27 mm in diameter, weighs 7.50 and has a ribbed
edge.  

The obverse was designed by Ferdinand Welz.  The coin was  
first issued July 1, 1957.
The obverse displays the Austrian eagle surrounded by
"Republik Österreich".  

The reverse shows the head of a lady, from the Wachau
region along the Danube, wearing the famous golden
bonnet of that district, the date is to the upper right, "10" to
the lower right and "shilling" around the left edge.  

The composition is Copper-Nickel plated over a pure Nickel
core (750/250), it is 26 mm in diameter, weighs 6.20g and
has a ribbed edge.  This reverse was designed by Kurt
Bodlak.  It was first issued April 17, 1974.